Half of workers expected to be freelance by 2020  

30 August 2018:

Up to 50% of workers are expected to turn freelance in the next two years, according to research from Kalido

The findings also revealed that 64% of UK-based businesses currently rely on freelance workers in some capacity; and 39% of business owners predict that their use of freelancers will grow faster than their number of permanent hires in the next five years.

The noted benefits of freelance work for workers included flexibility (79%), working on projects they believe in (42%) and keeping work exciting (30%).

Earnings for freelancers were found to be far higher than for regular employees. Freelancers make £50 per hour on average compared to £14.60 for permanent staff. More than a quarter (27%) of Millennial freelancers claim to earn to their full potential, with 6% earning more than £301 per hour.

The research showed that employees value freelancers in their workplaces for their fresh ideas and expanded networks (44%). Meanwhile seeing freelancers at work has prompted half (50%) of permanent employees to investigate a similar career move.

AI is credited by freelancers for opening up new job opportunities (46%) and changing the size and nature of the workforce (34%). As the number of UK small businesses continues to grow so does their demand for flexible workers – for 38% of freelancers small businesses are their typical clients.

Despite these positives, finding ongoing opportunities in this line of work presents challenges. Of those surveyed, 65% said job pipeline uncertainty is their biggest concern.

When it came to building a pipeline of work, recommendations and referrals from trusted sources were found to be a high priority. More than three-quarters (77%) of respondents prefer to find work this way because it is more likely to lead to work (63%) and the employer is more likely to be reputable (55%).

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Source: HR Magazine

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